GEORGE CLARKE AND CHRIS BRAMBLE

george-clarkeIn his current Channel 4 series, “Old House, New Home”, architect George Clarke asks potter Chris Bramble to make an umbrella stand for a couple featured in the programme and George has a go at throwing himself (above). (Series 3, Episode 1) George makes a pretty good fist of it, handling a large lump of clay, and, on his first go he does better than many beginners manage after a year of evening classes.

I’ve seen this kind of thing before. A mechanical engineer I knew with years of experience of lathe turning, asked me to show him how to throw and took to it at once.  The potter William Newland, who taught at Central School of Arts and Crafts (now Central Saint Martins), said, “I found that most students can be taught to throw. A small percentage are natural; some even though they are hooked on day one find throwing difficult if not impossible.”

I guess there are certain abilities, like the spatial awareness of the architect or the turning ability of the engineer, that can be transferred quickly to throwing on the wheel. Physical strength is essential, so is hand-eye co-ordination. Other qualities that make a good thrower are observation, discrimination and taking care. I have seen experienced amateurs who simply do not notice essential details of their making, such as the profile of a rim or a foot-ring. As in many occupations, like sport and music, good pottery-making depends on some innate qualities that cannot be learned.

HAND OF THE MAKER

On Tuesday I was stewarding at “Hand of the Maker“, the Society of Designer Craftsmen’s exhibition at Chelsea School of Arts. The SDC is the leading body of designer makers in the UK and their major shows always have interesting and outstanding work. I have chosen some that I like.

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Colin and Louise Hawkins

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Table by Neal Crampton. This large piece of elm was a rare find, extraordinarily beautiful and somehow enhanced by the split and the oak ties.

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Painted silk by Tori McLean.

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Batool Showghi’s touching, personal paper constructions recall her family’s life in Iran and refer to forced migration in the Middle East. Her close relatives were Sufis and musicians and suffered persecution in their home country. She told me that there were many Syrian and Iraqi refugees in Iran.

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Helen Banzhaf’s apparently abstract tapestries turn out to be pictures of vessels.

SOCIETY OF DESIGNER CRAFTSMEN (2)

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I’m delivering ceramics like this (above) this morning to “Hand of the Maker”, the Society of Designer Craftsmen‘s annual members’ exhibition, to be held this year for the first time at Chelsea College of Arts in John Islip Street, opposite Tate Britain. It opens on Friday, 13 July, and continues until 21 July.

I’m taking the opportunity to post a message from the SDC’s website about the refurbishment of our gallery and workspace in Rivington Street, a project that I’ve been involved with as a Trustee of the Society. I’ll continue to post news about the plan as it advances.

Fundraising for a Sustainable Future
“In our 130th year, the Society of Designer Craftsmen is excited to be working with Elliot Payne Architects to ensure the Society continues to be the success it is today. To help secure our future, we are currently fundraising to refurbish our headquarters in London’s vibrant Shoreditch to provide a members gallery for public exhibitions and creative spaces where members can meet clients and take part in workshops. If you wish to support us in this venture please contact chair@societyofdesignercraftsmen.org.uk.”

 

 

CERAMIC ART LONDON, 2018

Carina Ciscato

Ceramic Art London, at Central St Martins last weekend, was the best I have seen. The work at this annual show is increasingly international and goes far beyond members of the Craft Potters Association, who set it up many years ago.

The range of ideas and techniques employed is ever wider, and although there are still a few traditional studio potters, it seem that nothing is off limits now. I was struck by Roger Coll’s biomorphic forms in intense colours and similarly the work of Grainne Watts; Sophie Southgate’s dazzling hemispheres; Barbara Hast’s matt porcelain teapots on legs; Sarah Jenkins’ grafitti-like decorations; Jack Doherty’s exploration of buff and turquoise with a hint of wabi-sabi; Angela Verdon’s cool undulations in bone china; Peter Beard’s fractal-like surfaces; Monika Debus’s organic forms; Matt Davis’s subversion of craft in his pottery made by 3D printer; and my Harrow colleagues Carina Ciscato and Barry Stedman, who persistently push forward their medium, Barry now using pale colours and more line, Carina introducing texture by adding impurities to her porcelain.

Here are a few shots taken in passing.

Monika Debus
Ashraf Hanna
Sophie Southgate
Adam Ross
Lara Scobie
Peter Beard
Peter Beard
Grainne Watts