A HOUSE IN FRANCE

We stayed for a few days with our friends in France, where they have an old farmhouse well away from town in a peaceful spot with roses and fruit trees. In the sweltering heat we preferred to stay indoors, protected by two-foot walls, but the evenings were pleasant in the garden under the vines. Over … Continue reading A HOUSE IN FRANCE

SOCIETY OF DESIGNER CRAFTSMEN (2)

The Society of Designer Craftsmen is excited to be working with Elliot Payne Architects to ensure the Society continues to be the success it is today. To help secure our future, we are currently fundraising to refurbish our headquarters in London's vibrant Shoreditch to provide a members gallery for public exhibitions and creative spaces where members can meet clients and take part in workshops.

VOLTAGE DIP

I've been work furiously for shows over the summer, making use of both my kilns, and the other day my kiln mysteriously turned itself off in the middle of a firing. The cause turned out to be voltage dip, a temporary reduction in the power supply. I'd never heard of voltage dip before, but firing my kiln again and finding everything normal, suggests that this was indeed the reason for its stalling.

SOPHIE CONRAN TABLEWARE

I mentioned Sophie Conran's Pebble range of tableware in my last post and thought I'd say a bit more about it. It has been a popular range over a long period and says a lot about attitudes to handmade and factory-made pottery. It is factory-made, but with its wonky shapes and ridges it looks as … Continue reading SOPHIE CONRAN TABLEWARE

THINGS OF BEAUTY GROWING

I went to see the Fitzwilliam exhibition Things of Beauty Growing: British Studio Pottery for the second time. One of the changes that has taken place in studio pottery in the years since I first became interested in it is that it has become a topic of academic study, a fact regretted by the more … Continue reading THINGS OF BEAUTY GROWING

WEDGWOOD’S CREAMWARE

Much of the history of European ceramics is the attempt to imitate Chinese porcelain. The Ottoman Turks covered buff clay with white slip and a clear glaze. The Moors brought opaque white tin glaze into Spain, from where it spread to Italy, the Netherlands, central Europe and England. Meanwhile, there were experiments in porcelain, adding … Continue reading WEDGWOOD’S CREAMWARE