QUERUBIM LAPA

On a visit to Lisbon I found that the azulejo tradition is not only more deeply rooted in Portugal’s culture than I realised but that it remains alive and is being continually renewed.

The Lisbon metro has been decorated in azulejos over the last twenty years, using modern techniques like screen printing and styles and themes that are completely contemporary. Then, when we were walking past the Pasteleria Alcôa (the best pastry shop in the city), I saw the tiled shop front made by Querubim Lapa in 1960, a beautiful, softly-painted panel in shades of blue.

Lapa, I discovered, was one of Portugal’s principal contemporary ceramic artists. The high esteem in which tile painting is held in this country meant that after a training and early career in easel painting, he was able to concentrate entirety on ceramics.

The shop in Rua Garrett, originally for a seller of lottery tickets, Casa da Sorte, was a collaboration between architect Francisco Conceição Silva and Lapa. Lapa rated his contribution so highly that he asked for his application for the chair in ceramics at the school of fine arts to be assessed on it alone.

When Casa da Sorte closed, there was concern for the future of this fine ceramic work, but, when Alcôa took over the building in 2015, they undertook not to disturb it.

VIVIEN MOIR, FAUX NAIVE ILLUSTRATION IN THE DELFT TRADITION

I discover good ceramists every day. Here are two pieces by Vivien Moir, a Scottish artist. She trained as an illustrator at Jordanstone College of Art and Design and lives on the west coast of Scotland. I found these images on the website of the Water Street Gallery in Todmorden, and the Heinzel Gallery in Aberdeen, where she exhibits. Her blue-and-white illustrations recall the 17th century ceramics of Delft, in particular their naive pictures of Adam and Eve and of King William III on a horse. Utterly charming.

A LUCY RIE BOWL AT THE FITZWILLIAM MUSEUM

I took some Associate Members of the Craft Potters Association to the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge on Tuesday, to view and handle seven ceramics from their collection.  The Fitzwilliam has one of the best ceramics collections in Britain and doesn’t have room to display them all, so we were able to see some that aren’t on show.
Above you can see Dr. Julia Poole, past keeper of applied arts, explaining one of the works to us.

We were able to handle a celadon wine jug from Korea, a maiolica dish from the workshop of Durantino in Urbino, a very large Thomas Toft dish (left) with a picture of Adam and Eve, a Bernard Leach pagoda-lidded pot,  a yellow bowl by Lucie Rie, a colourful pot by Kate Malone and a hollow, monochrome form by Gordon Baldwin.  The pieces were chosen to cover a wide range of styles, methods and periods.  Dr. Poole is a specialist in Italian maiolica and gave a fascinating insight into the social conditions in which the Durantino dish was produced.  The Toft dish was naively, even crudely, painted, but with great wit and energy and a skilled appreciation of how to fill a space with an image and decorative elements and how to create rhythm and energy with three colours.

But the piece that stood out for me was the Lucy Rie bowl, in the centre of the table in the top picture.  It is 34cm wide, finely made, with a pitted and bubbly, sulphur-yellow glaze.  A Stoke-on-Trent potter would say that the glaze is faulty, but Rie, who made innovative use of pinholed, bubbling, and volcanic glazes, has judged it perfectly.  It was made in the early 1950s.  Perhaps it is unfair to compare it with the Leach dish, which was made towards the end of his life when his sight was failing, but it is so much more light and refined and lacking the peasanty affectation of Arts-and-Crafts pottery.

MANET’S CERAMIC CONNECTION


I was familiar with reproductions of Manet’s Déjeuner sur l’herbe (above) long before I saw it in the Musée d’Orsay but however blasé I was the impact of its size (more than two metres by three) and the juxtaposition of the naked woman with the clothed men was great.

In the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, which has one of the best collections of tin glazed pottery in Europe, I saw a fine maiolica dish (left) from the workshop of Guido Durantino (16th century) showing The Judgement of Paris. There, on the bottom right, was Déjeuner sur l’herbe though not so shocking as Manet because everyone is naked.



What’s the connection between Manet and a maiolica dish?  Durantino copied a famous engraving by by Marcantonio Raimondi (below) from a design by Raphael. Manet studied the old masters and copied the three principal figures in Déjeuner from Raphael’s design.

SQUATRITI: AN OLD DOLL’S HOSPITAL IN ROME


Before we went to Rome, I broke a ceramic figurine of sentimental value.  I should have packed it, because one of our finds was Squatriti, this doll’s hospital in the Via di Ripetta. It’s not the sort of thing you look for, but it’s typical of the unexpected things you come across while wandering in the city.

Among the others were a modernist sports centre from the Fascist 1930s designed by Luigi Moretti. The centre, Casa GIL, opposite our hotel in Trastevere, is still used as a gym and steps are being taken to restore it, but it’s in a sorry state and there are sensitivities about restoring Italy’s Fascist past. Here are pictures of it as it was and as it is today (below).

The government was introducing austerity measures and a round of demos was under way. This demo by school students (below) went past Casa GIL to the ministry of education down the road It was different from demos in England: here the teachers joined in instead of trying to stop it and addressed the students from the steps of the ministry.

Intense secular and religious demonstrations take place streets away from one another and in Trastevere there was a religious procession by Rome’s Peruvian community (below).

CONTEMPORARY ITALIAN MAIOLICA

Dolfi ceramics

We are going to Rome soon, after a successful Open Studio.  The last time I was there I bought a ceramic vase like this one, made in the Dolfi factory in Montelupo.  There was a big shop by the Piazza Sant’Andrea selling reproductions of Renaissance maiolica.  You see it all over Italy.  Market stalls in Florence overflow with it, much of it made nearby in the ancient pottery towns of Montelupo, Deruta, Gubbio and further north in Faenza.  Some of it is quite cheap, and most of it is no good.  It is well-made technically, but there is little innovation and the brush work is often weak.  Dolfi, which does some direct imitations of old maiolica, is a good exponent of this genre.

At the G. Ballardini State Institute of Art at Faenza, you can receive a training in the production and conservation of these ceramics.  Although some of the student work at the Ballardini is innovative, I have never seen it in the tourist centres.  Italy is a country of innovative modern design weighed down by its history.  Perhaps this time in Rome I’ll look out for some new and  modern ceramics.

Student work from the Instituto Statale d’Arte G.Ballardini, Faenza

GAUDI AND CERAMICS: ONE HUNDRED COLOURS OF WHITE

Josep Aragay, water fountain, Barcelona

I took a break in Barcelona after completing my new workshop. The tin-glazed peasant pottery in the gift shops is similar to the 18th and 19th century work in the expensive antique shops, from ancient pottery places like Manises. There is some nice architectural tile work in the azulejo style, like this water fountain in Santa Anna Square, made in 1918 by Josep Aragay (1889–1973).

Antoni Gaudi’s exotic buildings in the Modernisme style (Barcelona Art Nouveau, not to be confused with the modernism of Mies van der Rohe) employ smashed tin-glaze tiles and tableware in their mosaics. This is seen to very good effect in Parc Güell (early 20th century) and on the ventilation shafts (picture below) on top of La Pedrera, the fantastical block of flats (1880s) in Passeig Gracia.  The same decorative trick was used by Lluís Domènech i Montaner on the Palau de la Música, built at the same time as Parc Güell.  I don’t know who did it first, or whether it was already established before the architects of Modernisme took it up.

Gaudi, ventilation shafts on La Pedrera

Gaudi has large areas of white mosaic made from miscellaneous tin-glazed tiles, which are in one hundred colours of white, from potteries using different recipes over different shades of pink and red clay.

In a funny back-formation, the tourist shops sell gaudy Gaudi pottery this, with printed surfaces pretending to be mosaics of broken pottery.

HARROW CERAMICS COURSE TO CLOSE

Yesterday I went to a party to say farewell to Kyra Kane, (above centre) head of ceramics at Harrow, the University of Westminster. She is leaving following the University’s decision to close the Harrow course in 2013. The Harrow course is one of the leading ceramics courses in Britain and is respected throughout the world. The accountants have decided it costs too much. Of course, it always cost too much, but in past decades it was worth paying for; closing it means the University does not value it.

Kyra was one of my teachers on the BA Ceramics course. We also said farewell to Richard Phethean, Carina Ciscato and Daphne Carnegy, who taught on the first year of the course. There will be no more first year intake. Kyra, Richard, Carina and Daphne were important in my ceramics education, especially as they are all throwers and I am a thrower.

The Harrow closure is the latest in a series of closures of ceramics courses. There is no ceramics BA anywhere in Scotland now. The extraordinary thing is that the market for ceramics seems to be bigger than ever. The best data on this is in the Crafts Council’s survey of crafts activity in England and Wales, which found about 6,700 people working in craft ceramics in England and Wales. (Making It in the 21st Century, London, Crafts Council, 2004) From their data, I estimate that the annual sales of studio ceramics is about £114m. They say that, “During the 1980s there was an overall growth in the domestic market for crafts and an associated increase in the number of craft fairs and specialist shops,” and that the output of the crafts sector has more doubled since in 1994.

So why is a leading course training ceramic artists closing down? There is no national planning of vocational education and the universities can make their own decisions. There was a huge outcry from major figures in the crafts and education and I understand that there is concern at a senior level about the future of education for the crafts. Education in all crafts is expensive, because of capital costs and space requirements. If this is not squarely faced and adequately funded, training for this important industry will continue to decline.

Fortunately there is an imaginative initiative to provide another training route, complementary to university education. Lisa Hammond of Maze Hill Pottery is putting tremendous energy into a campaign to re-introduce pottery apprenticeships. Her Adopt-a-Potter scheme has a lot of support among ceramists and it deserves even more.