CERAMIC ART LONDON (continued)

I said that there were only a few traditional studio potters in Ceramic Art London last week and that there was more innovation than ever. Not surprisingly, some potters are unhappy about it. Eddie Curtis (above), a potter for forty years, and by no means conservative in his work, just missed selection and has written a long post on Facebook expressing his annoyance. He is leaving the Craft Potters Association (CPA) in protest.

Phil Rogers, a potter in the Leach tradition, who was for many years a leading figure in the CPA also writes about his disillusionment and explains why he left several years ago, feeling marginalized.

CERAMIC ART LONDON, 2018

Carina Ciscato

Ceramic Art London, at Central St Martins last weekend, was the best I have seen. The work at this annual show is increasingly international and goes far beyond members of the Craft Potters Association, who set it up many years ago.

The range of ideas and techniques employed is ever wider, and although there are still a few traditional studio potters, it seem that nothing is off limits now. I was struck by Roger Coll’s biomorphic forms in intense colours and similarly the work of Grainne Watts; Sophie Southgate’s dazzling hemispheres; Barbara Hast’s matt porcelain teapots on legs; Sarah Jenkins’ grafitti-like decorations; Jack Doherty’s exploration of buff and turquoise with a hint of wabi-sabi; Angela Verdon’s cool undulations in bone china; Peter Beard’s fractal-like surfaces; Monika Debus’s organic forms; Matt Davis’s subversion of craft in his pottery made by 3D printer; and my Harrow colleagues Carina Ciscato and Barry Stedman, who persistently push forward their medium, Barry now using pale colours and more line, Carina introducing texture by adding impurities to her porcelain.

Here are a few shots taken in passing.

Monika Debus
Ashraf Hanna
Sophie Southgate
Adam Ross
Lara Scobie
Peter Beard
Peter Beard
Grainne Watts